Difference Between Prose And Poetry Essay The Road

Often times, drama has been confused with prose fiction by several people. As a student of literature, I have seen so many people confuse the two together. Sometimes they say; “it’s all the same”. The question is this true? If not, what are the differences between them? These are

We will write a custom essay sample on

Difference of Drama and Prose fiction

or any similar topic only for you

Order Now
the question that I will attempt to answer in this essay. For the purpose of clarity and precision, It will suffice to make an overview at what literature itself is.

Literature can be seen as the collection of written works of a specific language, at a particular time, in a given culture which might be imaginative or creative in nature and is usually of specific artistic worth. Every society has its own literature but they are in different levels. Some are advanced while some are not. The basic genres of literature are drama, poetry, prose but in this essay, restriction will be on drama and prose fiction. Drama as a genre of literature is the detailed style of fiction characterized by acts. The etymology is from a Greek work which means “action” or “to do”.

On the other hand, prose fiction is also a genre of literature that deals with writings that differ in meter and rhyme to poetry. It is a form of writing that has a lot of similarity to our everyday speech. The question here is what differentiates these two genres of literature? How can we separate both when we see them? The answers to these questions are enumerated below in the following paragraphs. The first difference between drama and literature likes in the fact that drama is meant for a live performance which is directed at a live audience.

This is better portrayed in some words associated with drama such as words like play and show. On the other hand, a prose fiction is directed by the author to a single person at a time- the person reading the work. Another difference is that drama communicates in the present while prose does not. Also, in drama, the personality of the playwright is

We will write a custom essay sample on

Difference of Drama and Prose fiction

or any similar topic only for you

Order Now
mostly hidden in the sense that there are several characters in the work while in the case of prose fiction, the author selects the character and therefore, t\his personality might reflect in his work.

Furthermore, in drama the actor impersonates a role while in prose fiction the character imitates the person. In the case of drama, the entire thing the playwright has in presenting the story is the dialogue while in prose fiction the dialogue is imitated language that does not carry the plot forward. Another difference in drama and prose fiction lies in the fact that in drama, in order to make the audience understand the play better, gestures are used. On the other hand, in the case of prose fiction, what the author manipulates the text in order for the reader to better understand the work.

In addition, in drama, the audience decides what mode they will be although the dramatists have an influence over the mode but they can not alter the mode. In prose fiction, the author decides the mode, setting, the character and what he wants the reader to know. Summarily, it should be noted that although these two genres of literature have sharp differences, they both come from the same family and they both serve as means of entertainment and means of communication.

We will write a custom essay sample on

Difference of Drama and Prose fiction

or any similar topic only for you

Order Now

Prose is all about accumulation (a morality of work), while poetry as it is practiced today is about the isolation of feelings (an aesthetics of omission). Among other things, prose is principally an ethical project, while poetry is amoral, a tampering with truths which the world of prose (and its naturalistic approach to mimesis) takes for granted. Poetry creates its own truth, which at times is the same truth as the world’s, and sometimes not. Whatever the case, its mimesis is always a rearrangement, at a molecular level, of that axis between the “seen” and the “felt” (that coal chute which connects the childish eye to the Socratic heart), which, were it not for poetry, with its misguided elenchus, would remain obscured. In both classical and modern languages it is poetry that evolves first and is only much later followed by prose, as though in a language’s childhood, as in our own, poetry were the more efficient communicator of ideas. Whether this has to do with the nature of ideation or some characteristic intrinsic to the material evolution of tongues has never been adequately decided. Probably this evolution, from poetry to prose, depends on synergy—between the passion for thought and enthusiasm for new means. Technology also played a roll. With the spread of the printing press after 1440, texts no longer had to be memorized. Poetry’s inbuilt mnemonics (rhyme, meter, refrain, line breaks) were no longer essential for processing and holding on to knowledge. Little hard drives were suddenly everywhere available. But even a century later, in Elizabethan England, English prose had not yet come close to achieving the flexibility of poetry. One need only compare Shakespeare’s blank verse soliloquies to the abashed prose of one of the Elizabethans’ greatest disputants, Richard Hooker, or to the Martin Marprelate tracts. These are differences not only in talent but ones inherent to the medium. Even the King James Bible, “the noblest monument of English prose,” cannot compare to the blank verse of Shakespeare. New England, on the east coast of the New World, was settled before Old England would discover and colonize that vast intrinsic continent of prose, out of which the great syntactic nation states would evolve: Samuel Johnson, Thomas De Quincey, Charles Dickens. This evolution would also signal poetry’s waning, as cultural energy discovered more viable substances for conduction. There would be no more Chaucers or Miltons, poets not only of elaborate prosodic, lexical and rhetorical resources but serious public relevance as well. Wordsworth’s Prelude is perhaps the last of the available epics, a form which begins, as far as our reckoning permits, with Homer. Blake, in The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, has already tipped into prose. Emanuel Swedenborg, Blake’s model and goad (and a scientist by training), circumvented the limitations of 18th century Swedish prose by composing his Arcana Cœlestia in Neo-Latin. Poetry’s last major flourishing during the first half of the 19th century was a kind of Silver Age to what came before; it gave us a way to model our increasingly important private lives, as opposed to our public ones. This is its gift. Another Swedish writer, Tomas Tranströmer, last year’s Nobel, laureate, and the first poet to win the prize in sixteen years, when asked about his writing method, said that he doesn’t have one; he hinted at how close to evanescence our contemporary practice actually is: “…it’s hard to know what we really mean by writing for there’s a kind of inner writing that goes on all the time and it doesn’t need to finish up on paper…” *

 

* From a 1973 discussion with Gunnar Harding, translated by the Scottish poet Robin Fulton, Tranströmer’s most gifted English language translator.

 

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Difference Between Prose And Poetry Essay The Road”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *